PENETRATION

TESTING

A penetration test, or pen test, is an attempt to evaluate the security of an IT infrastructure by safely trying to exploit vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities may exist in operating systems, service and application flaws, improper configurations, or risky end-user behavior. Such assessments are also useful in validating the efficacy of defensive mechanisms, as well as, end-user adherence to security policies.

 

Penetration tests are typically performed using manual or automated technologies to systematically compromise servers, endpoints, web applications, wireless networks, network devices, mobile devices and other potential points of exposure. Once vulnerabilities have been successfully exploited on a particular system, testers may attempt to use the compromised system to launch subsequent exploits at other internal resources, specifically by trying to incrementally achieve higher levels of security clearance and deeper access to electronic assets and information via privilege escalation.

 

Information about any security vulnerabilities successfully exploited through penetration testing is typically aggregated and presented to IT and network systems managers to help those professionals make strategic conclusions and prioritize related remediation efforts. The fundamental purpose of penetration testing is to measure the feasibility of systems or end-user compromise and evaluate any related consequences such incidents may have on the involved resources or operations.

 

Why Perform Penetration Testing?

 

Security breaches and service interruptions are costly

 

Security breaches and any related interruptions in the performance of services or applications, can result in direct financial losses, threaten organizations’ reputations,  erode customer loyalties, attract negative press, and trigger significant fines and penalties. A recent study conducted by the Ponemon Institute (2014 Cost of Data Breach Study: Global Analysis) reported the average cost of a data breach for the affected company is now $3.5 million. Costs associated with the Target data breach that occurred in 2013 reached $148 million by the second quarter of 2014.

 

It is impossible to safeguard all information, all the time

 

Organizations have traditionally sought to prevent breaches by installing and maintaining  layers of defensive security mechanisms, including user access controls, cryptography, IPS, IDS and firewalls. However, the continued adoption of new technologies, including some of these security systems, and the resulting complexity introduced, has made it even harder to find and eliminate all of an organizations’ vulnerabilities and protect against many types of potential security incidents. New vulnerabilities are discovered each day, and attacks constantly evolve in terms of their technical and social sophistication, as well as in their overall automation.

 

Penetration testing identifies and prioritizes security risks

 

Penetration testing evaluates an organization’s ability to protect its networks, applications, endpoints and users from external or internal attempts to circumvent its security controls to gain unauthorized or privileged access to protected assets. Test results validate the risk posed by specific security vulnerabilities or flawed processes, enabling  IT management and security professionals to prioritize remediation efforts. By embracing more frequent and comprehensive penetration testing, organizations can more effectively  anticipate emerging security risks and prevent unauthorized access to critical systems and valuable information.

 

 

 

How Often Should You Perform Penetration Testing?

 

Penetration testing should be performed on a regular basis to ensure more consistent IT and network security management by revealing how newly discovered threats or emerging vulnerabilities may potentially be assailed by attackers. In addition to regularly scheduled analysis and assessments required by regulatory mandates, tests should also be run whenever:

 

  • New network infrastructure or applications are added
  • Significant upgrades or modifications are applied to infrastructure or applications
  • New office locations are established
  • Security patches are applied
  • End user policies are modified

 

 

How Can You Benefit from Penetration Testing?

 

Penetration testing offers many benefits, allowing you to:

 

Intelligently manage vulnerabilities

 

Penetration testing provides detailed information on actual, exploitable security threats. By performing a penetration test, you can proactively identify which vulnerabilities are most critical, which are less significant, and which are false positives. This allows your organization to more intelligently prioritize remediation, apply needed security patches and allocate security resources more efficiently to ensure that they are available when and where they are needed most.

 

Avoid the cost of network downtime

 

Recovering from a security breach can cost an organization millions of dollars  related to IT remediation efforts, customer protection and retention programs, legal activities, discouraged business partners, lowered employee productivity and  reduced revenue. Penetration testing  helps you to  avoid these financial pitfalls  by proactively identifying and addressing risks before attacks or security breaches occur.

 

Meet regulatory requirements and avoid fines

 

Penetration testing helps organizations address  the general auditing/compliance aspects of regulations such as GLBA,  HIPAA and Sarbanes-Oxley, and specifically addresses testing requirements documented in the PCI-DSS and federal FISMA/NIST mandates. The detailed reports  that penetration tests generate  can help organizations avoid significant fines for non-compliance and allow them to illustrate ongoing due diligence in to assessors by maintaining required security controls to auditors.

 

Preserve corporate image and customer loyalty

 

Even a single incident of compromised customer data can be costly in terms of both negatively affecting sales and tarnishing an organization’s public image. With customer retention costs higher than ever, no one wants to lose the loyal users that they’ve worked hard to earn, and data breaches are likely to turn off new clients. Penetration testing helps you avoid data incidents that put your organization’s reputation and trustworthiness at stake.

 

Penetration testing is the process of attempting to gain access to resources without knowledge of user-names, passwords and other normal means of access. If the focus is on computer resources, then examples of a successful penetration would be obtaining or subverting confidential documents, pricelists, databases and other protected information. The main thing that separates a penetration tester from an attacker is permission. The penetration tester will have permission from the owner of the computing resources that are being tested and will be responsible to provide a report. The goal of a penetration test is to increase the security of the computing resources being tested. In many cases, a penetration tester will be given user-level access and in those cases, the goal would beto elevate the status of the account or user other means to gain access to additional information thata user of that level should not have access to.

Some penetration testers are contracted to find one hole, but in many cases, they are expected to keep looking past the first hole so that additional vulnerabilities can be identified and fixed. It is important for the pen-tester to keep detailed notes about how the tests were done so that the results can be verified and so that any issues that were uncovered can be resolved. It’s important to understand that it is very unlikely that a pen-tester will find all the security issues. As an example, if a penetration test was done yesterday, the organization may pass the test. However,

today is Microsoft’s “patch Tuesday” and now there’s a brand new vulnerability in some Exchange mail servers that were previously considered secure, and next month it will be something else. Maintaining a secure network requires constant vigilance.

 

 

Pen-Testing vs. Vulnerability Assessment

 

The main focus of this paper is penetration testing but there is often some confusion between penetration testing and vulnerability assessment. The two terms are related but penetration testing has more of an emphasis on gaining as much access as possible while vulnerability testing places the emphasis on identifying areas that are vulnerable to a computer attack. An automated vulnerability scanner will often identify possible vulnerabilities based on service banners or other network responses that are not in fact what they seem. A vulnerability assessor will stop just before compromising a system, whereas a penetration tester will go as far as they can within the scope of the contract.

It is important to keep in mind that you are dealing with a ‘Test.’ A penetration test is like any other test in the sense that it is a sampling of all possible systems and configurations. Unless the contractor is hired to test only a single system, they will be unable to identify and penetrate all possible systems using all possible vulnerabilities. As such, any Penetration Test is a sampling of the environment. Furthermore, most testers will go after the easiest targets first.

 

How Vulnerabilities Are Identified

 

Vulnerabilities need to be identified by both the penetration tester and the vulnerability scanner. The steps are similar for the security tester and an unauthorized attacker. The attacker may choose to proceed more slowly to avoid detection, but some penetration testers will also start slowly so that the target company can learn where their detection threshold is and make improvements. The first step in either a penetration test or a vulnerability scan is reconnaissance. This is where the tester attempts to learn as much as possible about the target network as possible. This normally starts with identifying publicly accessible services such as mail and web servers from their service banners. Many servers will report the Operating System they are running on, the version of software they are running, patches and modules that have been enabled, the current time, and perhaps even some internal information like an internal server name or IP address. Once the tester has an idea what software might be running on the target computers, that information needs to be verified. The tester really doesn’t KNOW what is running but he may have a pretty good idea.

 

The information that the tester has can be combined and then compared with known vulnerabilities, and then those vulnerabilities can be tested to see if the results support or contradict the prior information. In a stealthy penetration test, these first steps may be repeated for some time before the tester decides to launch a specific attack. In the case of a strict vulnerability assessment, the attack may never be launched so the owners of the target computer would never really know if this was an exploitable vulnerability or not.

 

WHy ? Why Not ?! Better we tell it to you as someone figures out for you.